Exploring the region: things to do in and around Dovre

Photo: Asgeir Helgestad / Artic Light AS / Visitnorway.com A Muskox at rest in the Dovrefjell National Park. These impressive creatures can grow to 900 pounds.

Photo: Asgeir Helgestad / Artic Light AS / Visitnorway.com
A Muskox at rest in the Dovrefjell National Park. These impressive creatures can grow to 900 pounds.

Molly Jones
Norwegian American Weekly

If you’re a wildlife enthusiast, you’ll love exploring the unique Dovrefjell region, whether you’re on foot, on skis, or paddling along in a canoe!

To get the most out of your adventure in the Dovrefjell National Park, be sure to take part in the muskox safari. For 20 years, the park has been guiding adventurers through the mountains to experience the muskox in its natural habitat.

The safari runs daily during the summer months and lasts for five to seven hours. Each tour starts at the Oppdal Railway Station at 10:00 a.m. Hikers are encouraged to bring a camera to capture photographs of these unique creatures, which can grow up to 900 pounds. But muskoxen aren’t the only animals in the area; you’ll also get to see some reindeer and mountain grouse if you’re lucky.

You are also welcome to request a private tour at any point during the year, as long as you’re willing to strap on some snowshoes or cross-country skis. Even dog sledding is available for those willing to pay the extra cost.

Several other guided safaris are offered as well, so be sure to do your research and find the perfect tour for you. There are guided moose tours, fishing trips, and even a wildlife photography workshop available in the Dovrefjell National Park.

For more independent travelers, there are many options for renting bikes or canoes, in addition to many great hiking trips.

One of the most popular hiking routes takes you up to Viewpoint Snøhetta, which was commissioned by Norwegian Wild Reindeer Centre North and built by the architectural firm Snøhetta in 2011. The “World Building of the Year” 2011 is a steel construction featuring a wooden shape to the south and a glass surface to the north.

Hikers start at the Tverrfjellet parking lot and climb 1,500 meters (about 5,000 feet) to reach the viewpoint. Along the way, you’ll learn about the last 10,000 years of the Dovrefjell region through a series of informative stone slabs.

Once you reach the top, you’ll have a magnificent view over the majestic mountains of the Dovre-Sunndalsfjella National Park as you relax at the stunning viewing pavilion.

This article originally appeared in the Feb. 27, 2015, issue of the Norwegian American Weekly. To subscribe, visit SUBSCRIBE or call us at (206) 784-4617.

You may also like...

%d bloggers like this: