Klima X in Oslo named top Nordic exhibition

The first thing the visitors see is a large wall covered with waterproof rubber boots. The visitors put on the boots and prepare to enter the exhibition. Photos: The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology.

The climate change exhibition at the Norwegian Museum of Science & Technology beat 23 other entries.

The climate exhibition Klima X, which was launced in 2007, will run until December 2009. The exhibition was opened by Dr. Rajendra Kumar Pachauri (director of the IPCC and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate) together Jens Stoltenberg (Norwegian Prime Minister).

Klima X shows the causes, effects and possible solutions to global warming. The exhibition aims at increasing the knowledge of human induced climate  change and promote engagement and action from the visitors. The innovative Swedish architecture studio, Codesign, lead by Peter Ullstad, has created the exhibition design.

Ullstad got the idea for Klima X when he was wading across St. Mark’s Square (Piazza San Marco) in Venice in rubber boots. (Klima X’s visitors also have to wear rubber boots). “The concept is completely interactive, and visitors get to feel the climate changes on their bodies through the water and the melting ice. The fact innovative interactive installations make sure that the exhibition leaves an impression,” Ullstad said.

“It was a brilliant idea to cover the exhibition floor with water. Then you can really see what kind of challenges many countries now face,” said Dr. Pachauri at the opening.

Klima X gives the visitors an unforgettable experience by stimulating all senses and to let interactivity play a key role. The exhibit was made in collaboration with the Centre for International Climate and  Environmental Research – Oslo (CICERO), the International Polar Year (IPY),  the University of Oslo as well as national and international environmental  organizations (World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Bellona etc).

Two enormous melting ice cubes symbolise the melting of the Arctic ice cap.  On the wall next to one of the ice cubes is an animation showing the melting of the Arctic summer sea ice.  The visitors can see that the North Pole might become free of ice by the year 2050.

Two enormous melting ice cubes symbolise the melting of the Arctic ice cap. On the wall next to one of the ice cubes is an animation showing the melting of the Arctic summer sea ice. The visitors can see that the North Pole might become free of ice by the year 2050.

Kathrine Daniloff, head of communications at Norwegian Museum of Science & Technology, believes that the exhibition idea reflects the museum’s goal of being Norway’s most daring, visible and dialogue-oriented museum. “We are happy to be recognized for the innovative exhibition that demonstrates the climate crisis.” she said in a press release.

Klima X and other new exhibitions and activities have contributed to an increase in visitor numbers for the museum. About 208,000 people entered the museum last year, an increase of over 55 % from 2004. The museum was also one of three nominees for Norway’s “Museum of the year” in 2008.

More information visit: The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology.

Source: VisitOslo/ The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology.

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