Norway’s eccentric princess

Martha Louise’s claims that she can speak to the dead rile some who believe that it tarnishes the Monarchy

Photo: Frankie Fouganthin / Wikimedia Commons Princess Martha Louise at the wedding of Princess Madeleine of Sweden in 2013.

Photo: Frankie Fouganthin / Wikimedia Commons
Princess Martha Louise at the wedding of Princess Madeleine of Sweden in 2013.

Finn Roed
West Bloomfield, Mich.

Recently, in Oslo, Martha Louise held a paranormal seminar, charging NOK 1,400 to attend. Apparently, she runs an Angel School in Norway, together with Elisabet Noreng. The school was founded in 2007 and seems to deal with angels and the paranormal.

The controversial British medium had been invited by Martha to the seminar, where some of the public attending was promised the opportunity to converse with their relatives. Martha did not offer such sensational conversations this time, but she has earlier claimed to be able to communicate with the dead.

The reactions to such activity have been strong in Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. Martha is fourth in line to the throne and her Royal status gives credence to a doubtful and speculative industry. The concern is that she is tying the Monarchy to a swindle. Some feel she should remove herself from paranormal activities, because the Monarchy is generally viewed as being conservative, being caretakers of Norwegian traditional historical values. The Royals are expected to act within the norms of earlier times.

Martha has been confronted about her behavior, and she appears defiant, saying that she’s a part of the Royal Family and that people can think what they want. She believes that she stands for what is true, and believes she has a right to do that.

Interestingly, the Palace has no comment. But Martha Louise represents the Royal Family, which represents Norway. She’s the sister of the next king, Crown Prince Haakon. The Royal Family accepts her behavior; are they then all responsible?

Many commentators see her behavior as weakening the Norwegian Monarchy.

This article originally appeared in the Oct. 3, 2014 issue of the Norwegian American Weekly. To subscribe, visit SUBSCRIBE or call us at (800) 305-0271.

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