Warm air from the Azores heats Norway

Warm air from the Azores heats Norway
Last year at this time, the ski season had started. This year, the weather is mild and above freezing in the mountains during the first week in November.

Mild fall weather has Norwegians celebrating.

Mild fall weather has Norwegians celebrating.

Last year at this time, the ski season had started. This year, the weather is mild and above freezing in the mountains during the first week in November.

At the beginning of October last year, the school children had their gloves, hats and jackets out. On October 21, the winter came and the first snowfall paralyzed the south.

Aftenposten reported drifting snow and cold that polished the roads and sent cars into the ditch. This weekend a year ago the first ski resorts opened, and the second week in November, electricity prices skyrocketed due to cold weather alerts.

The autumn weather over large parts of the country this week is not going to hike the electric bill much, and this is due to warm air from coming in from the south.

“The coming week will be mostly a southern wind and mild temperatures. There is warm air coming from far south. This air comes from high pressure areas to the west in the Atlantic Ocean, around the Azores, which is why it is so hot,” says meteorologist John Smit at the Meteorological Institute in Oslo.

“It is very mild in southern Norway, especially in the mountains. But along the coast of Finnmark, it is down to 3.2 degrees celsius with snow on the peaks, so there is a difference between north and south.”

And the mild weather continues through the week.

“There is a high pressure system east of the country of Finland and western parts of Russia, and west of us there is a low pressure system over the British Isles. When the wind blows from the southern border, we mainly get the mild air,” says Smits.

Although it will go a little up and down with temperature, the average will be relatively mild in most parts of the country this week.

Source: Aftenposten

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