Iron roses from around the world

Artists Tone Mørk Karlsrud and Tobbe Malm display some of the roses they've received from around the world. Photo: Frode Hansen – VG

Artists Tone Mørk Karlsrud and Tobbe Malm display some of the roses they've received from around the world. Photo: Frode Hansen – VG

Artists Tone Mørk Karlsrud and Tobbe Malm in Bærum Works outside Oslo are slowly filling their workshop with meticulously crafted iron roses in unique varieties. They have come in mostly from abroad.

The roses will be a central part of the monument to the memory of victims of the July 22 terrorist attacks-which the two artists themselves initiated.
“To date we have received about 250 roses from around the world, and we expect that we will eventually get up to 500 pieces. We need that many if our vision is to be carried out,” said Tobbe Malm to VG.
“The blacksmiths have put a lot of work into these roses, and the response to the project has been incredible,” said Malm.
The two expect that they will get help from between 300 to 400 blacksmiths to make roses. Some of the relatives of the victims also have also helped to create their own roses to cover the sculpture.
“We want this monument to be a continuation of the amazing rose-parades that occurred after the terrorist attack, and all these roses shows that support for victims is strong all over the world,” said Karlsrud.
Two large monuments have been planned in support of victims of July 22. One will be in Oslo, and one at Utøya. The two artists hope that their works will be chosen to compete in the Oslo competition along with other contributions.

The roses will be a central part of the monument to the memory of victims of the July 22 terrorist attacks-which the two artists themselves initiated.

“To date we have received about 250 roses from around the world, and we expect that we will eventually get up to 500 pieces. We need that many if our vision is to be carried out,” said Tobbe Malm to VG.

“The blacksmiths have put a lot of work into these roses, and the response to the project has been incredible,” said Malm.

The two expect that they will get help from between 300 to 400 blacksmiths to make roses. Some of the relatives of the victims also have also helped to create their own roses to cover the sculpture.

“We want this monument to be a continuation of the amazing rose-parades that occurred after the terrorist attack, and all these roses shows that support for victims is strong all over the world,” said Karlsrud.

Two large monuments have been planned in support of victims of July 22. One will be in Oslo, and one at Utøya. The two artists hope that their works will be chosen to compete in the Oslo competition along with other contributions.

“We are hoping for Oslo, but the monument will be erected somewhere no matter what,” said Karlsrud.

Karlsrud and Malm were on their way to a meeting of art smiths on July 22, and got the idea to create the monument in the days afterwards. The two think it has been powerful to work so closely with such a symbolic project.

“We have received much support from several family members, and that has been important. It is their children we must remember,” said Karlsrud.

The two artists plan to unveil the monument at the two-year anniversary of the terrorist attack, July 22, 2013.

The work will be 16.5 feet high, and the top of the sculpture will rest a rose-covered globe. It shall represent unity and global engagement, and the names of all the victims will be carved into the granite foundation.

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