Brundtland speaks at the the University of Idaho

Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland, former prime minister of Norway and former director of the World Health Organization (WHO), will provide the keynote address for the University of Idaho’s 2009 Borah Symposium on Tuesday April 1 at 7:00 p.m. Information on this year’s symposium is available at Uidaho.edu. The event is free and open to the public.

As an international leader in sustainable development and public health, Brundtland will provide acute insight to the symposium, titled “Building Health, Building Peace.” 

“There is a vital relationship between health care and peacebuilding, which exists not only in the pre- and post-conflict environment, but also contributes to resolving ongoing conflicts,” said Borah committee co-chair Michael Greenlee, associate professor and law librarian. “Our panelists and speakers bring a diversity of experiences to this year’s symposium, which should make for an informative and exciting discussion.” 

The four-day symposium began Sunday, March 29 with a documentary film presentation of “Triage: Dr. James Orbinski’s Humanitarian Dilemma” at the Kenworthy Performing Arts Center. An introduction and commentary was provided by representatives of Doctors Without Borders.  The remaining Borah Symposium events took place on the University of Idaho campus. 

About the University of Idaho 

Founded in 1889, the University of Idaho is the state’s flagship higher-education institution and its principal graduate education and research university, bringing insight and innovation to the state, the nation and the world. University researchers attract nearly $100 million in research grants and contracts each year; the University of Idaho is the only institution in the state to earn the prestigious Carnegie Foundation ranking for high research activity. The university’s student population includes first-generation college students and ethnically diverse scholars. Offering more than 150 degree options in 10 colleges, the university combines the strengths of a large university with the intimacy of small learning communities.

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