Barneblad: Sokk kosedyr

(Stuffed toys made from old socks)

Photo: Heidi Håvan Grosch

Photo: Heidi Håvan Grosch

Heidi Håvan Grosch
Sparbu, Norway

What is trash, really? Shel Silverstein wrote a poem called Hector the Collector. It is about a boy who collected everything. He loved his treasures… but “all the silly sightless people, came and looked… and called it junk.” I love what others throw away because almost everything can become art. In Norway ReDesign is popular. That is when you take something and make it into something else. So over the next few editions of Barneblad, I will be sharing some craft ideas that I tried with fourth through eighth graders this summer at an art camp here in Norway.

Photo: Heidi Håvan Grosch

Photo: Heidi Håvan Grosch

Do you ever have the problem that when you go to sort your socks after laundry day you have only one of a pair? Perhaps you have used that lone sock to make a hand puppet, but have you ever tried making a stuffed animal? It’s easy and all you need is stuffing, an old sock, and some small rubber bands (the kind you use in your hair or in crafts).

I got this idea from this website where you will find more complete directions: www.daneillesplace.com (Sock crafts for kids).

Photo: Heidi Håvan Grosch

Photo: Heidi Håvan Grosch

Instructions:
These are general instructions, but my Norwegian students didn’t always care which part of the sock was facing up. Some liked doing this so much they made five stuffed toys! Use your creativity and uncover which creature takes shape for you. A tip: these would make great presents!

1. The feet: Take an old sock (or a new one if you want a specific color or type of sock) and stuff the toe (have the heel part up). Make two feet by wrapping a rubber band around a ball of stuffing in the filled sock. It is easier if you stick your finger out from inside the sock to make a little ball of sock and stuffing you can then wrap a rubber band around.

Photo: Heidi Håvan Grosch

Photo: Heidi Håvan Grosch

2. The arms: Use the same procedure as the feet to make the arms.

3. The neck: Continue to fill the sock with stuffing and wrap a rubber band around the neck part. Before making the head, wind some yarn or string around the rubber band legs and arms and neck. This makes them stronger and if you don’t do this the rubber bands might pop off.

4. Stuff the head and wrap a final rubber band at the top. Look at the examples to see what some of my students did. Do you notice that some made a ponytail with the extra sock, and one pulled the stuffing out of the top to make hair! Some sewed a mouth while others went without. Anything goes, so have fun!

This article is a part of Barneblad, a monthly feature by Heidi Håvan Grosch to share with kids and grandkids.

This article originally appeared in the Oct. 2, 2015, issue of the Norwegian American Weekly. To subscribe, visit SUBSCRIBE or call us at (206) 784-4617.

You may also like...