The perfect recipe

Subject and medium pair nicely in Christian Kjelstrup’s food portraits of authors

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup Christian Ketsjup himself.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup
Christian Ketsjup himself.

Tove Andersson
Oslo, Norway

The author Christian Kjelstrup, now called “ketchup,” got the idea of portraying authors in food on dishes and giving them punny names after a rather unusual epiphany.

The Aschehoug editor and author did not fully understand how the idea would take off as he published his first food art on Facebook.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup Henrik Ripsen.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup
Henrik Ripsen.

“They were serving sausages in the cafeteria at work. In the midst of the dish, I glimpsed the face of my favorite writer, Pessoa.”

Quickly he took some ingredients to the office, locked the door behind him, and tried to recreate what he’d seen. The result was Fernando Pølsoa (pølse=sausage).

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup Fernando Pølsoa.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup
Fernando Pølsoa.

Author Frode Grytten became Frode Grøten (porridge) overnight.

At the launch party, Norwegians rushed to get a signed copy as Ari Behn, the spouse of Princess Märtha Louise, boosted the book Uroens Kokebok where he is portrayed among other authors.

Uroens_kokebok_omslag

The book consists of 100 author portraits made from food and accompanied by author names with a lot of snacks: Camilla (Cotelette) Collett and Tom (Eggland) Egeland are two.

Kjelstrup (Ketchup) has received a lot of attention for this project. He was on fathers’ leave when he got the idea, but since returning to work he has to make the food art by night.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup Margaret Spinatwood.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup
Margaret Spinatwood.

Famous author Dag Solstad came to the release as Dagurk (agurk=cucumber) Solstad and Rolf Jacobsen honored the famous Norwegian Friday night dish—tacos—by becoming Rolf Tacobsen.

The images in the book were tested on Facebook to overwhelming response.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup William Shakespear.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup
William Shakespear.

The Aschehoug editor was also behind the pop-up bookstore that sold one title, the favorite writer Fernando Pessoa’s The Book of Disquiet.

If one is hungry for more, the book may help.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup Dorris Dressing.

Photo: Christian “Ketsjup” Kjelstrup
Dorris Dressing.

To purchase the book in the U.S., contact Kjelstrup on facebook at www.facebook.com/uroens.bokhandel. You can also view some of the images and related puns on Instagram (@uroens_kokebok).

Born in Oslo, Tove studied anthropology, history of religion and ethics at UIO (University of Oslo.) She worked in social services and wrote Jeg heter Navnløs (My name is nameless) in 2002. She’s worked as a freelance journalist since 2007, starting up with travel, music, and book reviews, while writing poetry and fiction as a hobby.

This article originally appeared in the June 17, 2016, issue of The Norwegian American. To subscribe, visit SUBSCRIBE or call us at (206) 784-4617.

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